Digging Through The Crates


Digging Through The Crates p1

Digging Through The Crates

a cohesive breakdown that shows the relationship between old school songs we pick and hip-hop songs that sample them and the producers that created them.

Everybody knows samples and hip-hop go hand in hand. Hell, the first monetized hip-hop song, “Rappers Delight,” was a direct sample of Chic’s “Good times”. Often times some of the best rap songs contain samples of old soul from the 70’s or 80’s. A lot of hip-hop’s major producers got their signature sound from sampling Kanye, The Bomb Squad, and Just Blaze, to name a few at the least. Any good sampling producer knows in order to perfect this craft it takes a lot of digging and researching. Which leads me to the presentation of my newest section on In No Particular Order–Digging Through The Crates–a cohesive breakdown that shows the relationship between old school songs we pick and hip-hop songs that sample them and the producers that created them.

 

Bloodstone + T.I.

Today’s Digging Through The Crates picks are 2 of my dirty south favorites. The first one is from producer/sampling extraordinaire, Kanye West. He produced a song on the second album of, at the time, up and coming southern lyricist, T.I. The Song sampled bits of the Bloodstone classic “I’m Just Doing My Job.” T.I. came right behind them and named his song; you guessed it “Doin My Job”. T.I’s song was a smooth ride through the trap providing answers for why he and his project pals did what they did to survive. As for the original record by the Bloodstones, it was a love ode to their woman about why they loved her so much, they simply stated “I’m just doing my job.” Cute, huh?

 

David Ruffin + Juicy J

The second pick is from a very underrated producer/sampling extraordinaire, Juicy J, who also rapped on this song. He sampled bits of the David Ruffin classic, “Statue Of A Fool.” Juice’s song was titled “Name It After Me”. The song has a smooth angelic theatrical build backed by quacking bass and snapping snares. It fit perfect on Juicy’s 2002  debut album, Chronicles Of The Juice Man, which is deemed an underground classic. The David Ruffin original, although still smooth and angelic, lacks the rambunctiousness that Juicy’s song had and goes for a more somber tone. In the song, Ruffin explains how he let his lady go and now they should build a statue of the world’s biggest fool and name it after him.


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